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and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these if things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are
, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. -- like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding together these economies. -- disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the u
. federal deficits were .8%. that's .8% of gdp. now our trillion dollars federal deficit amounts to 7.3% of gdp. back then trade was aa contributor to economic growth for the, economy. reunion $500 million at $4.2 billion adjustedio for inflation, and we're running a trade deficit,it trade deficit $536 billion. $536 million. back then social security made up 6.5%. 6.5%. of the federal budget. 6.5%. the decayed and medicare didn't exist back then. let's compare that to what we are doing now. a 20% of the budget on social security, and then we throw a 21% more of the federal budget for medicare, medicaid, and another 13% for other social programs, food stamps. so that comes up to a whopping 54% of the budget. 54%. forgot to mention this. it is kind of important, isn't it? back than median family income was about $38,000. $38,000. today it is $62,000. we will pretend that looks like a two and that looks like a six. we haven't done too well, more than half a century in raising a the median income ine this country and that is something he is right about, we do have to fix that. imagine thi
really talk about the budget or what this deficit means? can we really say if you are going to solve this problem x, y and z absolutely has to happen. it is not a question of whether you are a democrat or republican. this has to take place. no millions of dollars you throw in a campaign will change in the mathematics. >> let me ask you about "the dust bowl." all of your films in some ways can be coaxed out of them is some modern day resonance and we can get to that. first, talk to me about this period of history and what drew you to it. >> first of all, you are always drawn to stories. people forget the word history is made up of story. it is not boring dates and facts t. is stories the way human beings communicate. when you start researching something that you didn't know that much about -- we all have conventional wisdom. you say dust storm and we have an image. and then we think cotton prices and the depression and moving to california and it mostly takes place in california. the real dust bowl, this area of the panhandle of oklahoma and texas and a little bit of kansas, colorado
have a $16 trillion deficit right now. we have the deficit because of social security, medicaid, medicare, welfare, food stamps -- all policies put into effect by the democratic party. everything is socialism. thomas jefferson said it best -- the republic is doomed. people sacrifice -- i'm a libertarian. i am more objective. i'm not a republican or democrats. i have to wonder if i want to live in this country. 29% of americans got some kind of assistance when ronald reagan was president. i have to consider and i'm considering moving to a tropical island and watching america go down the drain. we need to abolish social security, medicare, and medicaid. host: i will stop you there. we appreciate your thoughts. joseph says -- will go back to stay but by the president on the passing of norman schwarzkopf. host: "his legacy will e ndure." back to your calls. caller: good morning. god bless us. [indiscernible] where is the love? .e're at a church when the president and everybody was running. the church was all over the program. we're in the church. do you know what happened? when we f
just passed reduces the deficit $23 billion. the last farm bill that we passed that was completely paid for at my insistence as budget committee chairman. if everyone else were functioning the way the agricultural sector has would not have the budget problem. we faced up to reality. we had more pay fors than expenses. in this bill even far more in the way of deficit reduction. it demonstrates this is possible to do. but you got to have leadership and you got to have people who are willing to make some tough decisions to get it done. >> we have about five minutes and i want to talk more personal. you have decided to leave your papers of your quarter century plus to george washington university. why is that? >> i went to george washington university. they have tremendous resources there to take advantage of this collection which is loaded with history. >> what kind of things will researchers and historians find? >> i will find a single-minded focus on fiscal responsibility for 26 years. my staff says the remarkable thing i am looking at this collection is how consistent i have been about.
deficit. it is time for the president to step up. knowing this fiscal cliff was going to take place for well over a year, the president has not acted in good faith. what we are doing today is three things. number one, we are moving a centralized negotiation back to where it should become a decentralized basis, so 435 house members can vote and speak on it and express their baby opinion. hopefully the senate can take it and amend, but this debate belongs inside the united states capitol. last year, we heard so much about the 99%. this will give tax breaks to them. it is permanent. this is good for the economy. it is good for economic growth. i urge a yes vote on the rule. >> i have no further. >> gentleman from california. gentleman reserves his time. >> i cannot say it enough. the legislation is a step backward. plan b, plan c, neither is a serious proposal but are designed to get headlines. they are making it harder to find common sense solutions to the impending fiscal cliff. the time for the games is over. it is time the majority comes to the table with a serious proposal. as i s
about how california is broke, there's a structural deficit. there isn't a structural deficit anymore. there's $1.9 billion -- >> yeah. >> but that is small. it was $25 billion just a couple years ago. this problem is a good part of the way toward being solved, and i think if people would have -- i don't think people even still completely understand that. and to me, the big question is, are the democrats, now that they have two-thirds majorities in each house, are they going to blow it up again and create new deficits like when gray davis was in charge, by rewarding in spending and locking in unions and things like that. >> and i think the democrats do have the supermajority in both the state senate and the state assembly, but a lot of the new freshmen coming in are from more centrist districts. they won by small margins, and i don't think it's a foregone conclusion that they're going to be steam-rollering with big government. voters also passed prop 39, which closed a corporate tax option of -- some would call it a loophole to pay a lower tax. that brings another $1 billion into the
the deficit so social security cuts remain on the table but in the mean time, the president proposed his own plan b, to extend the bush tax cuts on income under $250,000. >> once this legislation is agreed to, i expect democrats and republicans to get back to washington and have it pass both chambers and i will sign the legislation into law before january 1st of next year. it's that simple. >> well, i was surprised by the events this week in terms of the boehner total disaster. i just -- i didn't really get the whole plan from the beginning and i don't understand why you have people vote for a tax increase that mappings to break the pledge that they've all signed but it has no chance of becoming law and clearly, his caucus didn't understand it either. dillon what did you think? >> two things. first and foremost, i think boehner was trying to get action in washington, which we haven't seen and people have been very critical of this move. i thought it was a fairly shrewd political move in that if they were able to actually get the package passed -- >> right. >> it would have put the ball back
of these politicians, mayors, governors should take a half cut pay to pay down the deficit. host: we are going to move on to darwin on the line for independents. caller: it is like the pentelikon, back in 1968 i was even fighting with the pentagon over budgets. you always had to have everything kept the same. nobody was going to change anything because next year there were going to pop everything by 10%. they told you got to worry because you would get 10% more. that goes all the way back to 1968. they just keep dwelling on one thing over and over again. i would like to know from the boston globe or the herald is asking for pictures of -- host: let's move on to del on the line for democrats. caller: this is an outrage that they cannot tax the wealthy by an additional 4%. this is the lowest tax rates that have ever paid in the united states. considering that their incomes are vast compared to what they used to be many years ago when they paid a much higher rate, they are wealthy and they do not want to pay. 4% does not amount to enough to affect the deficit. maybe we ought to consider 15% or something
-defense cuts, and you have this huge amount of revenue, deficit reduction, it is hard to see what demands the republicans think will be easier to make, the new year. guest: you have also seen all the polls that show that the president's popular the is close to an all-time high, and the polls show definitively that the republicans will be blinged if we go over the cliff and taxes go up. that was before the debacle of this past week. it has been a bad week for conservatives. it sounds to me like they're continuing to be a little delusional. host: when you make a public threat, you better be able to back up -- guest: washington wizards might have had a worse week. from a political standpoint, this was a monumental embarrassment for the speaker. host: i want to make sure i get the title of this correct. "the guide to the federal budget." how big is the federal budget? how much do take in? , to do spend? how much is $16 trillion? >> total payroll spending will be about $3.80 trillion. revenues will be about $2.80 trillion. we have a deficit of about $1 trillion. that is for fiscal 2013. that a
the difference between the annual deficit and the national debt. the national debt is the fiscal cliff. we say it's unsustainable. from a mathematical standpoint, it is almost insurmountable. the only thing these taxes will do, i have graduate students who could not put into words what a trillion dollars was. host: go ahead and finish your thought on what these taxes will do. caller: what they will do is they will give the politicians a little leeway to fool around with the national deficit, the annual deficit, but they will not put a dent in the $16 trillion debt that we owe. that is the problem. host: we appreciate that call. over the past couple weeks, c- span has been conducting interviews with some of the retiring members. we have been showing those interviewed this week. tonight, one of the retiring members we spoke with is representative lynn woolsey, a democrat of california, served about 20 years. here's a portion of that interview. [video clip] >> i was on welfare because my children, ages 1, 3, and five years old, their father was diagnosed manic depressive, he would not do anything ab
reduces the deficit $23 billion. the last farm bill that we passed was completely paid for at my insistence, as budget committee chairman. if everybody else were functioning the way the agriculture section has, we would not have a problem. we in the agriculture committee face up to reality. we had more pay-for spend expenses. -- baena expenses. i think it demonstrates this is possible to do. by you've got to have leadership. and you've got to have people who are willing to make some tough decisions to get it done. >> we have about five minutes. you have decided to leave your papers to george washington university. why is that? >> i went to george washington university and got my master's in business there. they are tremendous resources there to take advantage of this collection, which is really loaded with history. >> what kind of things will researchers and historians find in your papers? >> they will find that kent conrad has had a single-minded focus on fiscal responsibility for 26 years. my staff says a remarkable thing in looking at this collection is how consistent i've bee
but the debate over the deficit and the debt that is behind this? >> well, if you go back to 2001 and thereafter, the cost of the war was not included in the budget except the military and the defense budget. but the additional costs were not reflected in the budget. there were always supplementals. so they didn't show as a deficit. a vendor ackley to the debt. so while the budgets were reasonable in that period of time, the actual spending didn't show in the budget and people didn't pay as much attention to the debt as they do today because it kept mounting and so we borrowed to pay for the war and in fact we didn't ask people to make sacrifices financially. >> there is a difference between borrowing in the future, paying for work and paying back words, we are having to pay right now. people might have felt differently if they had felt the pinch right at that time. we would have asked different questions and were asked, and i think that is one of the reasons we got where we are. and it's where we are. >> on appropriations could you have been any more vocal about it to provide us getting into t
agreed to steep a spending cuts going into reduce the deficit. cuts now are just around the corner. >> the president says he's optimistic but did f.a deal can not be reached he'll tell hairy reid to introduce a fall back bill. >> put a bill making sure tax on middle class families don't goup, that unemployment is available for two million people z that lays ground work for additional deficit reductions and economic growth steps we can take in the new year. >> the bill, as the president calls bare minimum isn't what many hoped for, pushing off until next year, larger pron lems of dealing with the cuts. the study by george mason university found cuts will result in two million jobs lost and a $215 billion drop in the nation's gross domestic product. for california, it means defense spending will be cut by half a billion dollars, 12,000 children would lose their access to head head start programs and fewer women would receive screening. 7,000 victims of domestic violence would lose services. 8,000 fewer californians tested for hiv. 296,000 students could see their benefits cut and emp
. is this deal, if it's to be reached, will not the so-called grand bargain with trillions of dollars of deficit reduction. in fact, jeff, it's not even clear this deal-- again, if there is one-- would stop the across-the-board spending cuts for the defense department and other government programs. it looks like those cuts will go forward. what the president said today is 24 hours from now the senate leaders have to have a plan that deals with incom income taxes at a rate to be determined later, the threshold of that income, and some federal benefit and if they don't reach a deal, he will have his own plan b. >> if we don't see an agreement between the two leaders in the senate, i expect a bill to go on the floor, and i've asked senator reid to do this, put a bill on the floor that makes sure that taxes on middle class families don't go up, that unemployment insurance is still available for two million people, and that lays the groundwork then for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in the new year. but let's not miss this deadline. that's bare minimum that we
, we, republican are not trying to solve the fiscal cliff. we're trying to solve the debt and deficit. can you explain that? >> sure can. yeah, the white house has been very focused on what do we have to do to just get past the fiscal cliff. let's get over this bump and keep spend and keep going. in the house we're actually trying to solve the debt and deficit. let me illustrate this. we have a trillion dollars in deficit spending last four years. president says let's go back to the clinton levels of taxation. if we went back to the clinton levels of taxation we're still double the highest bush era of deficit spending still because spending was accelerated so much in 2009 and 2010. we're trying to bring the spending levels back down. on the contrary if we just brought the spending levels down to the clinton level spending instead of tax level going up to clinton level of tax it is would solve this. we're trying to solve the debt and deficit. we're trying to say how do we get out of debt. the president is saying let's get past the fiscal cliff and let's keep moving on. that doesn't sol
taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approach. instead of doing it through taxation, he can do it through the entitlements. guest: those are both ideas that have been raised, especially the social security and medicare benefits for the wealthy and potentially might not need them to live off of. one tricky part of that is wealthier americans have been paying these taxes for decades into social security and medicare if and a lot of folks have a problem with the idea of taking away their benefits they have paid for if just because they happen to be more well off. and issued the first caller raised and something to watch is this could really sort of set the tone for the president's second term. if this thing gets ugly and stays ugly, it's probably going to stay that way at least another year or two, and the next thing you know, he's a lame duck president. if we cut a dea
-class families that are already facing a real financial panic. >> warren buffett could pay off the deficit he wanted to. but it is to be that a deal will happen after january 1. does that make any difference? >> yes, it does. i think some of all this panic is a little bit overwrought. if they don't reach a deal in the next 22 hours or so, then we go into january, and the stakes get so much higher. as you said, people will start feeling immediately the effect of those higher taxes. and that will put the pressure on the congress and president reach a deal. if they don't reach a deal on december 31, which is my prediction, i believe sometime before the end of january, they will reach a deal. but my goodness. one of the things that is frustrating is we have known this day was coming for the last two years. yet here we are, 72 hours away and we don't have a resolution. gregg: this is a contrivance that they are desperately trying to fix. our member the president said in a debate, the debate, he said that i didn't come up with this. then bob woodward came out and said, yes, you did. you know, both
. what will this mean for the economy? what will it mean for the deficit if this small deal, mini deal is passed? >> well, that could be a big problem because basically he's left out a lot of critical issues. the sequester. we didn't hear him talk about that so we don't know how they'll deal with the automatic spending cuts and defense. and he didn't talk about the physician payment issue. physician under medicare are expected to get a 30% cut at the beginning of year. we don't know how that will work out. >> and he didn't say anything about the debt limit and this is one of the things he wanted in this fiscal cliff deal. by leaving that out, are we in for another big fight next year? >> it certainly looks like it. it seems to be-- and i've heard this from many people-- that republicans think that the debt limit is their best leverage to get deep spending cuts. they didn't want to give it up in these negotiations. it certainly-- it looks like it's too radioactive to deal with in the next 10 days. so beginning in january and february, we're going to have a fight over the debt limit. and
and lays the groundwork for further work on both and deficit reduction. >>pam: house speaker john boehner failed to gain enough of his party's support for his "plan b". that proposal would have raised taxes only on those americans making more than one million dollars a year. without a deal, steep tax hikes and massive government spending cuts are set to kick in after january first. as the fiscal cliff countdown continues. house and senate members and president obama. have all recessed for the christmas holiday. >> the ninth circut court of appeals today blocked a california law which bans the controversial therapy. that aims to turn gay minors. straight. the three judge panel issued an emergency order, to put the law on hold until the court can hear further arguments. the law. which governor jerry brown signed in september, was set to take effect january first. it would make mental health professionals who engage in efforts to change a clients' sexual orientation. subject to discipline by state licensing boards. >> jacqueline: there rainfall continues with the center showers and more for
-14 and 14-15. the mayor's office is currently projecting a 263 million dollar deficit for that two year period and that shortfall results from approximately 344 million dollars in known cost increases which is offset by 81 million dollars in estimated revenue growth over the same period. as always, this gap will have to be closed by the time the mayor submits his report, general funding departments reduced our budget, our general fund support by 3% over the next two fiscal years and they've asked us to make a 1 and a half percent cut in 13-14 and a 1 and a half percent cost in 14-15, the budget reduction targets that we received from the mayor's budget office are 465 thousand dollar reduction next year and a 558 thousand dollar reduction the next year, so in the scope of the budget reduction that they have received over the last three or four years, this is eminently manageable. two years ago, we were asked to make a 20% budget cut, so this is something that feels like we can accomplish hopefully with relatively little pain. we would hope to meet this 3% target as well as any cost inc
but the result of budget deficits across the board and i think they have born the massive bruntd of this within the technology world. >> i agree. >> finding number four -- the finding we were asking to react to. another consequence of dt for departments and participate in city wide initiatives and give up operational independence and for this i state that i agree. because other departments haven't had full faith in dt and not willing to give up operational independence. >> i would agree with that and i think that talks about the structural things we were talking about and structural issues and i look forward to the dialogue going forward and i think there are changes to be made here. >> number five and coit policies and changes and not communicated effectively to the mayor and coit and for this i would -- actually i think i partially agree. i would say partially disagree and i state while coit policies and city wide initiatives are communicated clearly there is no follow up or deadlines to carry out policies and initiatives. number six. this was set by an administrative code change i lghtde
? supervisor kim: the budget is tough this year. even though our deficit is not as large as it has been, it is tough because we have made these cuts already, and did this point, we are cutting things we really do not want to cut. and it is painful. we will lose more potential services. we will also not be able to support our residents. we are looking at weekend meals for seniors. it is painful. i think we have to look at it as a combined approach. it has to be cut within city government that we can bear -- services that are less essential. second, you have to look at raising revenue in the city. i think it needs to be a combination. and third, need to be much better informed, and we have to ask our public employees to look at the budget. and they already have, but also to look back. it is a threefold approach to me. >> what are the city's housing needs him much of the board of supervisors to to address them? supervisor kim: it is tough, because we depend on the market to build housing for our residents we build at over 150% of the need. we are building over the need of the market rates.
, the fact we've had four straight years of trillion dollars plus deficits, when the president says he wants to raise taxes on those $250,000 or above, that only generates $850 billion over the next ten years. we have had 1.422, 1.29 and on the way to another trillion dollars deficit for these years. what the president is proposing is not pragmatic whatsoever and really is a reflection of him i suppose living in a fantasy world. >> what do you think the deal that speaker boehner offered the president? >> well, i was against the plan b because i don't see this as being a tax revenue increase issue. most important is spending. we could georgia back -- go back to the simpson bowles commission. the most important thing, we have to deal with spending. we live in an america where the federal government now is spending 25% of our gross domestic product. when you study the obama budget that would increase to 32%. that's where the problem has to i am emanate from. the spending side of our budget is 62% of what we spend money on. it's not just about defense or discretionary. >> is there any indication
, and that lays the groundwork then for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in the new year. >> joining us now from capitol hill. south dakota republican senator john thune, a member of the budget committee. so, senator, what do you make of the president's plan? >> i'm just glad the president is engaged. you can't do big things in washington, d.c. without presidential leadership. that's what we haven't had. the fact that he is now owe table. better late than never i would argue. at least he is at the table presenting something that wl give us a chance hopefully to get some bipartisan support in the senate and perhaps get something to the house that will avert what everybody agrees is a major economic disaster. but we're still waiting for the details and obviously there is a long ways to go and this is a very -- there is going to be a tough needle to thread in order to get this done. >> see, i don't understand why the democrats think that this is an economic disaster going off the cliff since really it's just a democratic agenda. cuts to defense and higher tax
serious about cutting the defsht and deficit? >> this is, look, this is the greatest irony of this entire discussion. and it is getting lost too much i think in the sometimes in the weeds of the back and forth negotiations. remember, the reason that we're doing this is because this grew out of the 2010 elections and debates over raising debt ceiling that following summer, 2011. the entire purpose was to reduce the size and scope of government in a way responsible to the voters of that midterm election. instead what we're almost certain to see is an expansion of government in the name of reintroducing it. we're likely to see much bigger government long term. we're not likely to deal with entitlement reforms as we need to do. as you suggest the president is pushing some short-term spending increases often in washington turn into long-term spending increases. gregg: but, steve, bill kristol, conservative, you know what, time to throw in the towel. you do not want to get blamed for raising taxes on 98% of americans. >> right. gregg: right? >> look, bill kristol is my boss and editor at "the w
into the situation we are in right now, with the huge debate over the size of the deficit and the debt? >> go back to 2001 and thereafter. the cost of the wars was not included in the budget. they were always supplemental. they did not show as a deficit. while the budgets looked reasonable during that time, the actual spending was greater. people did not pay as much attention to the debt. it just kept mounting and growing. we borrowed to pay for the worse when we did not ask people to make sacrifices financially. there is a difference between borrowing in the future, pang forward and backwards, or having to pay right now. people might have felt differently if they had felt a pinch right at the time. they would have asked different questions than were asked. that is one of the reasons we got where we are. >> could you have been any more vocal about appropriations? >> i was vocal. when i got on the appropriations committee, i became chairman of the legislative branch. that is everything, all of the buildings. office buildings, 1700 capitol police forces, and all of their help, support staff. i held
program run a billion deficit in 2012 . as the program brought in over 725 billion in cash and spent more than it earned it is costing 773 billion. >> julia: and you are surprised. benefits reached over 8 million and 820,000 in increase in november . so something shady is going on here. >> you used the word shady . i think that is a pretty good word to use. definition of who is disabled is expanded over the yearrs and recently, as you have a massive rise in unemployment and work force clinking and clearly some people are taking the disability option as opposed to staying in the work force. you can call it shady or financially unfortunate but it is happening. we never had as many people on disability ever before. >> clayton: republicans have a look at entitlement programs and we are trying to reign in the excessive spending. >> there are no serious cuts from president obama. there is serious effort at reforming. medicare and medicare. a lot of people don't say social security is enment. it is an insurance program. but it is enormous amount of money flowing out than in and it is getting wor
, and lays the groundwork for further work on both growth and deficit reduction. that's an achievable goal. that can get done in ten days. >> reporter: you hear we are talking about the words "achievable goals." the reality here is we have fewer days to work with, less talk about some sort of a grand compromise, and more talk about trying to do something to get things done for americans. randi? >> what do you make of the language and tone? i mean, is any sense of a deal sort of evaporating judging from what we're hearing from both sides, tough talk? >> at the very least, we aren't hearing a lot of warm words between the two toward each other. we know they've been working on this for weeks. you just don't hear that thawing when you hear them talking as they did just within the past 24 hours. shows a lot of work to be done in the next few days. how much is behind the scenes when they're divided geographically is the part we don't know. >> yeah. the president certainly also asking -- suggesting that everyone needs time to cool down. will this new proposal pass with republicans, do you think?
, if we want to make a dent in the deficit. i mean this is the choice that is going to be in front of us. if, we have to do four things if we want to reduce the deficit. we have to get more revenue, we have to cut domestic spending, we have to trim and reform the health care programs in particular of medicare and medicaid and we have to cut defense. if we do all four of those things we can make significant down payment getting deficit under control. if we do some of them, the numbers are not there enough to make as much progress as we want. this is where mark and i agree. over next six to nine months we could see substantial progress towards smart fiscal policy in the country if the two parties come together. heather: we'll see what happens. thank you both very much for joining us until monday night. thank you. >> merry christmas. happy new year. [heavy breathing]. gregg: boy, remember that, video from april of 2011. monster tornado tearing through tuscaloosa, alabama, devastating the community and alberta baptist church. ever since then the church's pastor has been fighting insurers and
to help the country at the same time reduce the deficits which are confronting. we were handed a number and the budget control act to reduce the defense budget by $487 billion over the next decade. based on my own budget experience at the time, i knew that the approach should be not to simply cut across the board and hollow out of the force. but try to develop a strategy, what is it what the defense department to be not just now but going into the future as well. that is the purpose why we developed the strategy. today i want to describe the strategic environment shaping our future. the progress we have made toward implementing the strategy and the risks we face as they work every day to try to keep america safe and secure. before i continue, let me pay tribute to a couple people here who join me at the head table. my deputy secretary plays a crucial role in helping me and dod develop and implement this strategy. i deeply appreciate his dedication and commitment to the department. i also want to pay tribute to my undersecretary for policy who was also here and worked very hard on that s
affected. again, they've already given $103 billion toward deficit reduction and almost every scenario that we've considered a likelihood federal employees get hit again. >> ifill: let me ask you each briefly. are you optimistic or pessimistic from what you read about the prospect of a deal? >> i'm very optimistic. i think they will do something to avert sequestration, yes. >> ifill: hugh johnson? >> very clearly i think that the message of the markets is we're going to avoid a significant tax increase and significant spending cuts or the economy is not going to go into a recession in 2013 and that's really the key in this whole thing. or, i would add, 2014. so i'm cautiously optimistic. i'm holding on to my -- i'm crossing my fingers and holding on for dear life. >> ifill: crossing your fingers and toes? stacy palmer? >> i hope we'll some kind to an agreement soon but whatever happen there ises is s going to be deficit cutting and we'll have to face decisions so that could be rough. >> ifill: stacy palmer, jacque simon and hugh johnson of johnson illington advisories, i wanted to get
insurance for 2 million americans and lays the groundwork for further work on both and deficit reduction. >>reporter: the remarks came after house speaker john boehner failed to muster enough of his party's support to bring his "plan b" to the floor. his proposal would have effectively raised taxes only on those americans making more than one million dollars a year. >> we had a number of our members who just really didn't want to be perceived as having raised taxes. >>reporter: the two sides each left the capitol for the christmas holidays, blaming the other for inaction. democrats said thursday's failure in the house pointed to a need for more compromise by the g-o- p. >> house republicans have gotten the message loud and clear that a comprehensive solution to the looming fiscal cliff will need to be a bipartisan solution. >>reporter: senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said the next move needs to come from the president. >> he is the only one that can do it. this isn't john boehner's problem to solve. >>reporter: without a deal, steep tax hikes and massive government spending cuts
's anti-fragile. you need also to have less deficit on the part of government and transfer it to the states. more decentralized decision making. why? because if you do you have decentralized errors. not one error dragging you down and last decade two errors in the down. iraq war. you know? it was a horror from human side. but it cost between 40 and 120 times the original estimates. you don't want mistake that is are very large. a fragile system is one in which mistakes are costly and the benefits are small and anti-fragile system is one in which mistakes are small and bring long-term benefits. we want to be in that environment and environment that ben filths of mistakes. >> i hear what you're saying. shifting the debt burden from the federal government and states and federal government is a better position to carry debt. states have these constitutional balance budget amendments and bail out the states, isn't it? >> this is exactly the problem we have is that the government finds it easy to borrow and runaway deficit. let me explain the big thing. a project in the uk where
available for 2 million people, and that lays the groundwork then for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in the new year. >> all of this still developing. and we will have more on all of it with mark shields and david brooks later in the program. >> also ahead >> warner: also ahead, between now and then; protesting a gang rape in india; mass producing high quality education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. walstreet finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget dea
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